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Internet Law and eCommerce

Our Cyber, Privacy and Internet Practice Group has accumulated decades of experience counseling clients on the law as applied to the Internet and cyberspace.

THE PRACTICE

The use of the Internet and e-commerce raises legal issues that combine diverse legal areas otherwise rarely to be found together: intellectual property, privacy laws, consumer protection, contract law, evidence law, etc.

Our Cyber, Privacy and Internet Practice Group has accumulated decades of experience counseling clients on the law as applied to the Internet and cyberspace. Our attorneys have a thorough grasp of new and Internet-driven technologies. They also have conquered precedent-setting legal work on Internet-related issues.

Representative topics we have handled include:

  • Liability of online platforms for defamatory speech, infringing material or privacy-invading content made available on them.
  • Legal best practices for online distribution of software and their automatic installers.
  • Contracts for developing and maintaining Internet websites and Internet-based systems and technologies.
  • Drafting Terms of Use, Privacy Policies and Copyright Policies for online platforms.
  • Surreptitious access to Internet subscribers’ emails by investigative authorities.
  • Online protection and licensing of intellectual property.
  • The application of the Israeli and U.S. penal code to online gambling sites.
  • The application of privacy laws and consumer protection laws to e-commerce.
  • The application of the Israeli and U.S. legal framework governing use of encryption, to online activities.
  • The do’s and don’ts of web linking, web crawling and scraping.

Among the group’s legacy litigation cases, we handled a first of its kind lawsuit in the early days of the Internet, dealing with a court order issued to an Internet access provider compelling it to produce to the IDF the e-mail correspondence of subscribers. This precedent ended with the State Attorney conceding to a substantial number of the arguments raised by the access provider. The State conceded that intercepting e-mail messages before they had reached the provider’s computers amounts to wiretapping and is therefore permissible only with a court order specifically designated to electronic eavesdropping.